Excel 2010 Tutorial - Graph

In this video from the Excel 2010 Tutorial series, School of Technology Program Coordinator, Justin Denton, teaches how to build a graph in Microsoft Excel 2010. This tutorial video is a great beginning step to your courses in technology at Rasmussen College.

Transcript

Graphs. Just find and replace and comments fairly quick and easy. Sometimes, graphs could be a little tricky, especially how you select your data. You'll have your chart built out. I've got a product name, some sales totals minus the product name. We got product one, product two, product three, and product four.

When you have such of this set up, you can essentially select the cells. Underneath your Insert tab, which most functions are going to be there, you can then select whatever type of chart. There's a whole chart section built out in Excel 2010. So if I want to select the column chart, I can select the type of column chart. Line, there's quite a few, two-dimensional and three-dimensional line charts. A pi bar, area, scattered, and so forth.

They'll have considerable amount of options. And they all work with different types of data. So if I want to do maybe a scattered chart, you might have a lot more trending history in your actual spreadsheet that you want to track. So then you could go under scattered chart and modify that.

For this one, I want to do, let's say, a 3D column chart. It's real fairly simple. You just select it. After you've selected the appropriate data, it will build your chart out automatically.

The cool thing is with 2010, you now end up with this new subsection of tabs that will appear. You've got your design, your layout, and your format tabs. We're already highlighted with our design tab. And this allows us to just change color, so in general, formatting for our actual chart.

If you need to change which columns and rows are selected, you can switch back and forth between row and column. You'll see that the column, or the row, sorry, is down at the bottom. [INAUDIBLE] switch it up, I'll know I may get the sales total down at the bottom in our products off to the right.

How are you doing it? Just by--

Just by clicking this button up in the top left, switch row column. If you need to reselect your data-- and it's pretty common. So when you're working with a chart, you're not always going to select the data right the first time. So instead of completely scratching everything and going from scratch again, you can reselect your data.

You'll also notice when we talked about those cell ranges, up in this new pop-up, you've got your chart data range. So this is sheet one. And then, you'll have an exclamation mark, which it will designate that on sheet one. We're going to talk about these cell ranges.

You'll have a dollar sign A, dollar sign three. The reason there's a dollar sign is it causes it to be a fixed range. If it didn't have the dollar sign, if you started moving things around, it'll actually cause your cells to move around as well with it. So when there's dollar sign in front of that range, it locks in the position. So no matter if I copy this off to another sheet or copy it into another workbook, it's going to keep that attached.

So maybe I didn't want B7. Maybe I don't want product four in this. So I can backspace it out and put B6. I'll change my range. So now, because I've changed my range, it'll now only include product one, two, and three. So you have a little bit of ability to kind of go back and forth, massage your chart to make sure it actually works properly.

If I go in here, maybe I'm not 100% sure. I don't want to type all this information. I just want to select it. You can still select it from this screen. So if I select this range, that works. Or you can just completely minimize this screen and only have the chart selection by clicking the button at the end of your chart data range.

I can go through there. Usually, that's in benefit. If you have a considerably large amount of information on this screen, you may need to actually do that just to see what's behind the pop-up. So if I go back, and I'll select the original range that I worked with, move it back in here, bring up that pop-up window, and then just click OK, then it'll go ahead and remodify my spreadsheet and give me everything that I need.

We also have some chart layout options. If you don't really like the layout, there's some default layouts that you can work with under your graphs or the Design tab underneath chart layouts. It's really basic. So you've got Microsoft preset views. If you want to see more of them, or you can always scroll up and down, or if you click the More button right below the scroll bars, it'll bring up every single chart option that you have available.

So I like this one. We'll go with this one. Gives me a quick way to go back and forth, change up my chart, make it look a little nicer than what it was by default.

If you go into your Layout tab, you've got the ability to really modify the way it looks. Maybe I don't like the presets. I don't want to look like I went with a Microsoft preset. Sometimes, that was always my thing when I was interviewing people. If they gave me a preset Microsoft resume, that usually never made it into the pile. Because I didn't want someone that just one with the template. I wanted someone unique.

So if I go into the layout, now I have the ability to make this a totally unique my own chart. So now I can work with data labels, insert axes, change the chart title. All these have little drop-downs, centered overlay, above more chart title options. You can go in through the more title options and more options on each of those categories, change how you want it to fill, any kind of patterns, border colors, enough to make it completely your own unique chart layout.

They'd all take a matter of a few seconds to go through here and just play around with them. You'll have your chart walls, 3D rotation. If you don't exactly like, we've chose a 3D chart. We don't like the actual pre-defined rotation. We can go through here, change the x and y and z-axis and how we want to rotate the chart and display our information that way.

Then, we have the ability to insert additional shapes, throw pictures onto it. Or if you just wanted to explain a little more information about your chart, you could draw a little text box in there and put custom titles and notes within your chart.

Then, we've got lastly the format which essentially is just more, I don't know, making your chart look a little more pretty than what it actually is. You can change some more colors, change some font styles, word styles, and things like that. Usually on the Format tab on pretty much any selection, it just gives you that much more customization for the item that you're working with. So let's say I'm done, I want the chart on a different sheet. I really don't like that. How do you usually typically move data from one sheet to the next?

Cut and paste.

Cut and paste. Cut and paste, right? And if I do cut and paste on this, of I do copy right now and paste, it's cool. It's on his own chart. But it's not totally clean. it's there. It's functional.

And really all you need to do is just right-click over in a white spot, let's say. You have the option here just to move chart. When you select Move chart, where it says instead of an object in a given sheet, go ahead and say that you want it on a new sheet. And we'll call that sheet chart one because it's default.

When you do that, it'll give it a really nice clean, almost like PowerPoint-slide-type look to your spreadsheet. So when I go to my chart, now I've got it really nicely laid out and don't have to worry about all the graphs and everything else behind it.

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Kendall Bird is an Online Community Specialist for Rasmussen College. With her Bachelor’s degree in public relations and a passion for social media, she enjoys writing motivating and enthusiastic blog content to encourage future, current and former students to learn more about their discipline of study. Kendall’s ultimate goal is to generate a positive community through blogging to promote learning and change lives.

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