Excel 2010 Tutorial - Table, Ribbons, Navigation

This is the first video of the Excel 2010 Tutorial series. School of Technology Program Coordinator, Justin Denton, outlines the basics behind Microsoft Excel, and shows how to create tables, ribbons, and navigate within Microsoft Excel 2010. This tutorial video is a great beginning step to your courses in the School of Technology and Design program at Rasmussen College.

Transcript

To start off with Excel tips and tricks, we're going to have a wide variety of topics that we're going to cover. So if you're not a beginner there's going to be some beginner topics that are covered. If you are a beginner, you're going to get those as well. I'm going to go into the advanced topics.

The topics I'm going to technically cover. I'm going to spend about five minutes on just a quick refresher on how Excel works, on the layout of Excel. There's going to be comments-- how to answer comments, update comments. How to use the find and replace. How to work with graphs and charts and build custom graphs. We're also going to get into creating formulas within Excel and go over some of the various types of formulas.

Some of the information-- We'll keep it concise. The handout has a lot of additional information in it. So if you have questions later on there's a lot of information in the handout that I built in.

We'll also cover or how to link between spreadsheets. So if you have two spreadsheets and you want to keep one up-to-date with the other's information, we'll show how to build that link in between the two. How to work with pivot tables. Do some general formatting, move around cells and so forth as well as do some conditional formatting and build out some conditional formatting and some sample tables. We'll also put together how to connect to databases. So if you work with external databases-- an Access database, an SQL database-- how to bring that information into Microsoft Excel and start working with it.

And lastly work with macros. We'll lightly touch macros because you can teach an entire class just on macro programming. So I'll show you how to do some really basic macro-- gets the job done. And then I'll go into if you wanted to modify the macro a little bit more, I'll show you how to get in there and do that. There's additional commands and stuff listed into the packet that I handed out or that was handed out. I didn't hand it out.

So if we get into our five-minute refresher. Typical Excel worksheet. Everything's going to be based off Excel 2010. Typically what's called a workbook is the file that you bring up. So I opened up an Excel file. It's going to call a workbook. Underneath here there's multiple sheets. You'll see by default Sheet1, Sheet2, Sheet3. Those are going to be your worksheets that you'll work with.

You've got the area to the left, which will be your row heading. And then you've got your column heading. You're going to technically not need those right off the bat. And you may never have used them. What they come into play is when we start actually building macros and putting formulas together. That's when you're going to need those cell references to actually create some functioning macros and formulas.

When you're working with your workbook, your active cell's always highlighted in a black outline. That's going to be where you're going to be working. You also have cell references. And pretty much just what we've covered in the worksheet spreadsheet layout.

If you also want to zoom in and out. Maybe you're a little too small. You want to zoom in a little further so you can see it on your screen. You've got what's in most Office applications, the zoom slider, plus and minus. It'll zoom in and out on the screen.

If we go into it, we've got some data in an actual spreadsheet. You've got your Undo/Redo buttons, typically up here in the top left. You'll have your Save, your Undo, and your Redo. So if you typo something and you want to undo it, that's where you're going to be looking at to work with.

When you have an active cell selected, an expression when you're working with formulas, the area that you're going to want to work with is the Formula Bar. In the Formula Bar, that's going to give you a more lengthy layout of actually working with what's in the underlying cell. Sometimes like in this instance, this cell's trumped by the next cell. So to find out actually what's in that cell, you'll just highlight it and just keep an eye on the Formula Bar. Other than that, when you-- and it'll come more into play when you're building charts and everything else-- is you'll need to worry about the cell range. If I select a range of cells, just keep in mind it starts with A1, ends with G1. That'll allow you to determine what range of cells you're working with. So when you build out a chart, you build out formulas-- a little bit of anything-- you'll need to know this reference so it'll actually put those all together correctly.

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Kendall Bird is an Online Community Specialist for Rasmussen College. With her Bachelor’s degree in public relations and a passion for social media, she enjoys writing motivating and enthusiastic blog content to encourage future, current and former students to learn more about their discipline of study. Kendall’s ultimate goal is to generate a positive community through blogging to promote learning and change lives.

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