How To Be A Leader At Your Job

No matter what job position you're in, leadership skills are beneficial for any worker looking to advance or navigate smoothly through their career. A study conducted by L.M. Watson at the Regional West Medical Center found that good leaders increase their coworkers' job satisfaction. Even though you may be a recent college graduate, you can be a leader in your company and advance faster than you thought possible with the following tips:

Go Above And Beyondleadership
Always make sure you're putting in your best effort at work to exhibit to your organization's leadership that you're dedicated and capable. Exceeding expectations will demonstrate to many people that you have leadership potential. The ability to collaborate with coworkers and help them develop can show management that you have the skills to serve your company effectively.

Examples of ways to go above and beyond:

  • Request to take on additional projects, even if they are not in your current scope of ownership
  • If you see a coworker struggling to complete a project or presentation, offer to assist them
  • When compiling reports, include additional data points to show that you are results-driven and want to see the company succeed

Look For Help
Many companies have formal mentor programs that pair newer employees with a more experienced coworkers who can help you learn the ins-and-outs of the company and your role. As your relationship progresses and you begin to understand the inner-workings of the company, offer your mentor a fresh view on workplace inefficiencies. If your company doesn't have such a program, consider asking one of your entrusted superiors to take you under their wing as a non-official mentor.

Don't Get Involved In Workplace Drama
Even if you agree with some of the office gossip, it will benefit you in the long run to avoid it. Be friendly and helpful, but avoid engaging in gossip, as it is not a good way to gain your coworkers' trust. Rather than chime in with a gripe of your own, ignore the situation or be candid with the issue when in a status meeting with your manager.

Ask For A Promotion
Once you've helped your superiors become successful, you should consider asking for an advancement. They will appreciate that you're taking the initiative and will look for ways to help you go farther. Even if it's not possible, you can still ask what you can do to improve or volunteer to take on more work. Once you do advance, be sure to pass on your methods of success.

External links provided on Rasmussen.edu are for reference only. Rasmussen College does not guarantee, approve, control, or specifically endorse the information or products available on websites linked to, and is not endorsed by website owners, authors and/or organizations referenced.

This article was transcribed by the Rasmussen College Blog team. Are you ready to take the plunge into a new, successful future? If so, learn more about our degree programs today.

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