Starting Your Career in Graphic Design

In this video we speak with John Mindiola III, a technology and design instructor at Rasmussen College in Brooklyn Park, MN, as he shares with us some key information regarding the graphic design career field and how valuable earning your degree in digital design can be.

Transcript

Hi. My name is Allie Gray Freeland, and I am the host of Rasmussen College's newest video blog series, What Should i Do With My Life? So in this series, we'll speak with expert instructors that will help answer the question, what should I do with my life?

So today I'm here with John Mindiola, III, who is a technology and design instructor for Rasmussen College in Brooklyn Park, Minnesota. So today he's going to share some really important information about graphic design and multimedia fields and really the steps that you take education-wise and career-wise to get where you want to be.

I would say the first step for starting a career in graphic design, or really any of the design fields, would be find out, what's your passion? Is it more art illustration focused? Is it print and experience focused? Is it video? Is it web? Animation?

Whatever it is, really focus on it and learn about it on your own. Do some research, ask people that you know about it. You can look up some companies in your area.

And then a really smart step, as far as I'm concerned, find a college that has what you're looking for. An overall program, the school as a whole. How does their design program fit into there, what kind of classes they offer, and even what are their career opportunities that you may have afterward.

And once you find that school or a few schools, dive right in, don't be afraid, and just learn everything you can about the field. It's a lot of fun.

A really hot topic right now in the design industry, and the creative industries in general, is whether or not a person needs a degree to enter into the field. A lot of people will say, no. With high-powered PCs and industry-standard creative software being widely available, a lot of people say you can just follow some tutorials, read some books, ask a buddy, you can learn a lot.

The reality is design education is much more than just software tricks. People will learn about the business of design. How to work with clients. How to be able to deliver on deadlines. How to present and communicate clearly.

Also, in a design education, at most schools there will be general education courses. Things like writing, history, sociology, psychology. These may not seem relevant at the time when a student is going through a program. But they will find as the move through their career these will afford them opportunities that they may otherwise not have had because they'll be able to understand people in the world and the world we live in a lot better. And they'll be able to think like businessmen and women and not just like designers.

All right, a very special thank you to John Mindiola, III, for sitting with us today to talk to us about educational and career opportunities in graphic design. So if this video sparked an interest in your desire to pursue educational opportunities in design and multimedia, please visit www.rasmussen.edu. Thanks.

External links provided on Rasmussen.edu are for reference only. Rasmussen College does not guarantee, approve, control, or specifically endorse the information or products available on websites linked to, and is not endorsed by website owners, authors and/or organizations referenced.

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