Criminal Justice Bachelor's degree - Rasmussen College

View courses and cost per credit for our Criminal Justice Bachelor's degree. Courses, course names, and cost per credit may vary by location. Download your state specific catalog for more information.

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Criminal Justice Bachelor's Degree Course List

Major and Core Courses

Upper Division

Criminal Behavior: Profiling Violent Offenders

This course will examine serial behavior by crime type and criminal profile. Crimes such as stalking, arson, murder, and sexual assault will be examined through case files to enhance investigative methods. Students will analyze psychological profiles and behavior patterns.

Prerequisite: Criminology: Motives for Criminal Deviance (except for students enrolled in the Cyber Security Program)

Course ID: J326
Credits: 4

Constitutional Law

This course challenges students to examine the complexities of the Bill of Rights and the application of those rights to the criminal justice system. The analysis of case studies will allow students to apply criminal law and procedure to fieldwork examination of criminal-justice issues.

Prerequisite: Criminal Law and Procedures: Crime and the Courtroom (except for students enrolled in the Cyber Security Program)

Course ID: J331
Credits: 4

Cultural Diversity and Justice

This course will examine the true picture and statistics of minority representation at every point in the criminal justice process, from point of contact with the police to incarceration and the death penalty. The course includes a comprehensive examination of unbiased racial and ethnic theories, and research and practice of behavior and victimization affecting the criminal justice system.

Prerequisite: Ethics in Criminal Justice

Course ID: J350
Credits: 4

Victims in Criminal Justice

This course explores the importance of the victim in the criminal-justice system's process. The victim's role in the criminal-justice process, and movements and legislation regarding victims' impact on judicial proceedings are examined. A variety of crimes and types of victims is explored.

Prerequisite: none

Course ID: J352
Credits: 4

Realities of Crime and Justice

"In this course, students will analyze and critique media portrayals of crime and justice. Public perceptions of crime and realities of crime are evaluated. The mass media and ""spectacular"" cases are used to exemplify the media's influence on crime and justice."

Prerequisite: Ethics in Criminal Justice

Course ID: J355
Credits: 4

Statistics in Criminal Justice

Students will learn to interpret research data on issues in criminal justice. They will explore fundamentals of statistical analysis through statistical tools typically used in criminal justice. They will apply statistical analysis using UCR and NCVS data sets.

Prerequisite: College Math Course

Course ID: J360
Credits: 4

Research Methods in Criminal Justice

This course will explore the basic steps of conducting research. Students will explore the nature of research and the research techniques specific to the criminal-justice field. Students will become familiar with research terminology and the ethics involved in various research designs. To complete the course, students will design and simulate their own research project.

Prerequisite: Statistics in Criminal Justice

Course ID: J365
Credits: 4

Criminal Justice Leadership and Management

This course will familiarize students with common management theory and practice in criminal-justice organizations. The application of management techniques to all areas of criminal justice will be explored, along with leadership and administration techniques and issues particular to criminal justice. Organizational philosophy, visioning, planning, and goal development will be examined.

Prerequisite: Ethics in Criminal Justice

Course ID: J410
Credits: 4

Crime Prevention

This course will explore the goals and types of various crime-prevention strategies. Physical environments and crime, neighborhood crime prevention, the media, and crime displacement will be explored. The course will examine persons and conditions associated with high rates of deviance.

Prerequisites: Introduction to Corrections; Policing in America; Research Methods in Criminal Justice

Course ID: J415
Credits: 4

Critical Issues in Criminal Justice

This course will examine trends, policies, processes, and programs in criminal justice. Careful analysis of criminal-justice successes and failures is the focus of this course. Students will theorize future initiatives in policing, courts, corrections, juvenile justice, and homeland security.

Prerequisite: Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice Capstone

Course ID: J490
Credits: 4

Choose Either Track I or Track II

Track I (Not Available for National Online Students)

Criminal Justice Internship

This course provides students with an opportunity to apply their learning through an internship experience involving participant observation in a professional criminal justice setting. During the internship experience, students will concurrently participate in discussions, journaling, and related coursework to integrate their academic and internship experiences.

Prerequisite: Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice Capstone; Student in last or second-to-last quarter

Course ID: J480
Credits: 9

Track II

Criminal Justice Seminar

This course provides students with the opportunity to explore an area of criminal justice that is of specific interest for their career or an area of relevant interest in the field. Topics may include any area of justice studies, with the approval of the instructor. Students will conduct a thorough review of their topic and present their work in the form of a final project.

Prerequisites: Statistics in Criminal Justice; Research Methods in Criminal Justice

Course ID: J453
Credits: 5

Criminal Justice Senior Thesis

Students will apply their knowledge of criminal justice issues and social research methodology by completing a research project on an approved thesis proposal. Students will design and carry out a research study, collect and analyze resulting data, and integrate their research and findings into a formal thesis.

Prerequisite: Criminal Justice Seminar. Students should be in their last or second-to-last quarter

Course ID: J457
Credits: 4

Elective Credits (Select 4 courses)

Examination of Forensic Science

Students will critically examine the role of forensic science in the criminal justice process and the court of law. They will review historical events in criminalistics, and analyze problems in forensic science in order to formulate recommendations for change. They will also explore best practices and the future of forensic science.

Prerequisite: Constitutional Law

Course ID: J305
Credits: 4

Criminal Investigations

Students will learn to conduct full criminal investigations. They will examine various techniques, methods, and processes for interviewing and interrogating crime suspects and witnesses. They will also explore techniques for conducting investigations with special populations.

Prerequisite: Constitutional Law

Course ID: J320
Credits: 4

Criminal Evidence

This course will familiarize students with the fundamentals of criminal evidence as it pertains to the legal presentation of evidence in criminal trials, and with the role of legal counsel. Constitutional issues involving evidence are examined. Different varieties of evidence, from hearsay to physical evidence, are examined. Trial procedures such as expert-witness testimony, police testimony, and testimonial privileges are analyzed.

Prerequisite: Criminal Law and Procedures: Crime and the Courtroom (except for students enrolled in the Cyber Security Program)

Course ID: J325
Credits: 4

Organized Criminal Syndicates

This course examines organized criminal activity in the 21st century, from street gangs to terrorist organizations. Students will examine the cause of organized crime, in addition to the investigation, prosecution, and sentencing of syndicates.

Prerequisites: Criminology: Motives for Criminal Deviance; Juvenile Justice: Delinquency, Dependency, and Diversion

Course ID: J330
Credits: 4

Women and Criminal Justice

This course examines the role of women as offenders, victims, and professionals in criminal justice. Theories and research that have differentiated women in the criminal-justice system will be explored. The rise of female criminality and criminal-justice professionals will be examined and will be analyzed.

Prerequisite: Domestic Violence

Course ID: J340
Credits: 4

Diversion and Rehabilitation

"Students will examine counseling and intervention methods used for adult and juvenile, and male and female offenders. They will explore theories proven by research and applied to treatment. They will critically evaluate evidence-based policy, best practices, program evaluations, and ""what works"" in both social service and criminal justice systems."

Prerequisites: Juvenile Justice: Delinquency, Dependency, and Diversion; Domestic Violence

Course ID: J345
Credits: 4

Community Corrections

This course will examine the role and function of corrections supervisors in the field. The practical considerations of managing offenders in the community will be examined. Case studies on probation and parole will be explored.

Prerequisites: Criminal Behavior: Profiling Violent Offenders; Introduction to Corrections

Course ID: J425
Credits: 4

Forensic Psychology

This course will examine the role and function of psychology as it applies to the criminal-justice system. Students will examine the responsibilities and tasks of forensic psychologists when working with law enforcement, courts, and corrections. A psychological approach to person-to-person crimes will be explored.

Prerequisites: Criminal Behavior: Profiling Violent Offenders; General Psychology

Course ID: J430
Credits: 4

Special Populations in Criminal Justice

Students will examine the special populations of offenders in the criminal justice system. The experience of women, minorities, the physically and mentally challenged, the elderly, and the socioeconomically deprived in all parts of the criminal justice system will be explored. Students will analyze programs, policies, and case studies relating to special populations.

Prerequisite: Criminal Behavior: Profiling Violent Offenders

Course ID: J435
Credits: 4

Special Offenders: Sex Offenders

This course will examine the causes of sexual offenses and treatment of offenders. Laws and policy pertaining to sex offenders will be analyzed. Research on sex offenders, including recidivism, treatment, and re-entry into the community, will be examined.

Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice (except for students enrolled in the Cyber Security Program)

Course ID: J440
Credits: 4

Special Offenders: Serial Killers

Students will explore issues and controversies involved in serial killer cases or mass murder investigations. They will cover topics including maintaining justice, victim's rights, interrogation techniques, media coverage of crimes, and grief.

Prerequisites: Criminology: Motives for Criminal Deviance; Criminal Behavior: Profiling Violent Offenders

Course ID: J445
Credits: 4

General Education Courses

Upper Division

Communication (Select 1 course)

Advanced Composition

This advanced writing course is intended to help students further develop and refine their writing, researching, and analytical skills, through the application of these skills to various rhetorical situations. To achieve these goals, students will be expected to develop their ability to present their views in an organized, unified, and coherent manner to diverse audiences.

Prerequisite: English Composition

Course ID: G324
Credits: 4

Visual Communication in the Media

This course examines how people understand their world through visual images. Students will examine how people visually gather, process, and interpret information presented through media sources.

Prerequisite: none

Course ID: G332
Credits: 4

Humanities (Select 2 courses)

American Literature

This course surveys authors, genres, and movements in American literature from 1865 to the present, including representative works of Realism, Naturalism, Modernism, and Post- Modernism/Post-Structuralism. Students will engage in critical readings of exemplary literary texts from a diverse group of authors that have influenced American literature since the Civil War. Students will analyze how these works of literature exemplify particular historical moments in U.S. history, as well as how they communicate pertinent cultural issues such as gender, race, ethnicity, class, religion, sexual identity, community, region, and nation. In their study of the broad range of American fiction, poetry, and drama since 1865, students will analyze literary, aesthetic, and critical developments.

Prerequisites: English Composition; Introduction to Literature

Course ID: G330
Credits: 4

Contemporary World Literature: 1900 to the Present

This course explores how authors from around the world have engaged with important themes and historical events throughout the twentieth century. In studying these texts, students will examine the interplay of fiction and history, the varieties of literary style, and the qualities that link as well as distinguish works from different cultures. Students will respond to texts critically in discussion and essays, as well as research critical evaluations of literary topics, authors, etc.

Prerequisite: English Composition

Course ID: G335
Credits: 4

Literature of American Minorities

This course introduces students to a variety of texts by American minority authors from the mid- 19th century to the present. The central focus of this course will be on literary responses to social marginalization based on race/ethnicity, gender, national origin, sexuality/sexual orientation, ability, and other factors. Students will study the effects of exclusionary and oppressive practices, both historical and present day, on writers' perceptions and literary representations of their times, contexts, and identity. Students will also be introduced to samples of the most common critical-theoretical approaches to the primary texts they will study in this class

Prerequisite: English Composition

Course ID: G435
Credits: 4

Political Thought

The aim of this course is to understand and appreciate some important authors and traditions of political thought. The course will cover such topics as authority, consent, freedom, and obligation.

Prerequisite: none

Course ID: G440
Credits: 4

Math/Natural Sciences (Select 1 course)

Human Uses of the Environment

This course provides an in-depth exploration of the integrated relationship between human life and the surrounding environment, beginning with a study of the fundamental concepts and principles of ecology. Topics that are interwoven throughout the course include principles of ecology as seen in the structure and function of the ecosystem; pollution of air, soil and water resources; population explosion and the relationship of people, disease, and food production; and environmental controls necessary for survival.

Prerequisite: none

Course ID: G328
Credits: 4

Physical Geography

This course presents a study of the development and distribution of landforms, climates, minerals, soils and water resources. Interrelationships between the physical environment and regional patterns formed by these elements are analyzed against man's utilization of them.

Prerequisite: none

Course ID: G346
Credits: 4

Conservation of Resources

The purpose of this course is to provide students with important principles of ecology and resource management. Emphasis will be on local, national, and global environment problems and possible solutions to these problems.

Prerequisite: none

Course ID: G350
Credits: 4

Gender in Math and Science

This course examines the personal and collective educational experiences, career paths, and discoveries of female researchers, teachers, and practitioners in the fields of mathematics and science.

Prerequisite: none

Course ID: G434
Credits: 4

Social Sciences (Select 2 courses)

American Religious History

"A survey of the contribution of religion to American culture, including the differences between rural and urban society, the development of religious freedom and the rise of a ""secular religion."" Examines the emergence of new forms of belief and practice and the variety of religious issues confronting American society today."

Prerequisite: none

Course ID: G333
Credits: 4

Visions of America Since 1945

Since the end of World War II, popular culture has become an especially significant aspect of American history and an important element in many of our lives. Consequently, this course will explore the ways in which popular culture has represented and mediated conflicts and tensions post-World War II. Through this lens, issues of gender and family relationships, as well as class and racial politics, will be discussed. The dual role of television as a reflective and manipulative force in the new suburban family and the role Hollywood films played in the popular culture will be examined.

Prerequisite: none

Course ID: G380
Credits: 4

Comparative Politics

This course will introduce students to the field of comparative politics by examining classification of political systems according to institutional and developmental characteristics. Causes and costs of political stability and instability will be explored. Comparison will be made between contemporary political institutions and processes in various countries.

Prerequisite: American/U.S. National Government

Course ID: G401
Credits: 4

Work and Family

This course focuses on the overlapping worlds of work and family. It examines both the nature of the links that exist between the two major social institutions as well as the issues and problems that result from the combination of individuals' work and family responsibilities. An emphasis is placed on female labor force participation.

Prerequisite: none

Course ID: G425
Credits: 4

Major and Core Courses

Lower Division

Computer Applications and Business Systems Concepts

This course teaches students basic to advanced computer concepts and skills, including creating and modifying Word documents, designing databases, spreadsheet creation and analysis, using the Internet and E-Commerce tools, and creating presentations with enhanced features and web tools.

Prerequisite: none

Course ID: D132
Credits: 3

Introduction to Undergraduate Research

This course provides a broad overview of information literacy concepts by introducing skills for locating, evaluating, and ethically using a variety of resources for a specific purpose. The course begins with the information cycle and the production of information, followed by the identification of a topic & research question, and the selection, evaluation and integration of sources into an annotated bibliography.

Prerequisite: none

Course ID: E170
Credits: 2

Introduction to Criminal Justice

An introductory course designed to provide students with a general foundation of knowledge in the criminal justice field. Course participants will explore the different parts of the criminal justice system, their interrelationships, and the role of each in the criminal justice process. Students will examine the historical basis for the contemporary American legal system, policing styles and the evolution of crime prevention, the structure of the judicial system and its professional participants from pre-sentencing through post-conviction, corrections strategies for criminal offenders, and special considerations for juveniles in the criminal justice system.

Prerequisite: none

Course ID: J100
Credits: 4

Criminology: Motives for Criminal Deviance

This course examines the social and behavioral issues involved in the study of crime as a social phenomenon. Included is an explanation of what crime is, what causes crime, and the various techniques for measuring the amounts and characteristics of crime and criminals.

Prerequisite: none

Course ID: J106
Credits: 4

Introduction to Corrections

A general overview of U.S. corrections, jails and prisons, institutional procedures and recent innovations in offender treatment. Students are introduced to correctional philosophies, practices and procedures. The concepts of retribution and rehabilitation are examined. For residential only, this course includes a fieldwork assignment.

Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice

Course ID: J115
Credits: 4

Policing in America

Students will examine the theoretical underpinnings of police work in the United States, including its historical roots, its current status, and the trends that will shape its future. They will explore the problems and solutions facing citizens, patrol officers, administrators, and agencies. They will also cover contemporary practices such as Community Oriented Policing, Problem Oriented Policing, and Directed Patrol. In investigating these topics, student will develop skills in critical thinking and problem solving. For residential only, this course includes a fieldwork assignment.

Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice

Course ID: J120
Credits: 4

Field Communications in Criminal Justice

This course emphasizes the skills of both oral and written communication with emphasis on writing formats used by justice professionals. Students will acquire the skills necessary to effectively communication within diverse communities.

Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice

Course ID: J140
Credits: 2

Introduction to Criminal Law

In this course, students are introduced to the Federal and State court systems. This course examines substantive criminal, definitions of crime, and principles of criminal responsibility. The course will use case studies for application of general principles to the law. Statutory defenses, mitigating factors, and circumstances which may excuse criminal responsibility and common law principles are examined.

Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice

Course ID: J150
Credits: 4

Applied Criminal Procedures

This course provides an examination of procedural requirements for the judicial processing of criminal offenders. The concepts of evidence sufficiency, standards of proof, and due process are explored. Students will examine the Bill of Rights and its applicability to the criminal justice process.

Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Law

Course ID: J170
Credits: 4

Domestic Violence

This course examines violence in the family; social and legal relations within families; theories and solutions on family violence; survivors and the consequences of victimization; legal responses; the role of the police; when law enforcement responds; recognizing child abuse; recognizing elder abuse; associated crimes and stalking and domestic homicide.

Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice

Course ID: J200
Credits: 4

Juvenile Justice: Delinquency, Dependency, and Diversion

An overview of the juvenile justice system including the nature and extent of delinquency, explanatory models and theories, the juvenile justice system, juvenile court practices and procedures. The role of law enforcement and juvenile correctional officer will be explored as well as juvenile training schools, probation and aftercare treatment.

Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice or Introduction to Human Services

Course ID: J213
Credits: 4

Practical Psychology for the Criminal Justice Professional

Students will examine how principles of psychology relate to the field of criminal justice. They will explore fundamental concepts from a criminal justice perspective, focusing on the real-world effects these principles produce on criminal justice professionals, their families, and the citizens they serve. Students will apply ideas from psychology to create effective victim and witness interviewing strategies, offender behavior-modification approaches, and coping methods. They will review the immediate and long-term physiological and psychological effects of stress, trauma, and occupational experiences unique to the profession.

Prerequisite: General Psychology; Introduction to Criminal Justice

Course ID: J246
Credits: 4

Drugs and Crime

"The course will focus on the physical, psychological, and sociological aspects of drug and alcohol abuse. Treatment and prevention of abuse will be explored. In addition, policy implications of drug use and the criminal justice system response will be analyzed. An overview of the theories of use, drug business, and drug law enforcement will be explored. Such recent developments as ""club drugs,"" inhalants, herbal stimulants, and designer drugs will also be discussed."

Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice or Introduction to Human Services

Course ID: J250
Credits: 4

Ethics in Criminal Justice

This course provides a strong theoretical foundation for solving ethical dilemmas. Students will gain a realistic picture not only of what ethical questions arise in criminal justice, but also of how sound moral decisions are made in response to them.

Prerequisites: Policing in America; Criminal Law and Procedures: Crime in the Courtroom

Course ID: J255
Credits: 4

Critical Thinking and Evidence-Based Practices in Criminal Justice

This course is designed to focus on a wide variety of problem solving skills. These include scenario based problem solving and evidence based practices. The inter-related skills necessary for effective problem solving in a criminal justice context are emphasized. The development of evidence based practices will be explored and the incorporation of such practices in the field of criminal justice will be analyzed.

Prerequisite: Policing and America; Criminal Procedures; and Introduction to Corrections

Course ID: J270
Credits: 4

Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice Capstone

The capstone class examines the future of the criminal justice system. The current cutting edge technology in different fields within the criminal justice system is discussed along with insights from accomplished scholars of what the near future holds. Methods and philosophies that will govern the criminal justice field in the near future are introduced along with discussions of the ethical, legal, social, and political ramifications expected. This course includes ten hours of field experience.

Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice. Students must be enrolled in the Criminal Justice program and in their last or second to last quarter

Co-requisite: Junior Seminar

Course ID: J280
Credits: 4

Lower Division

English Composition

English Composition

This course is designed to guide students in understanding the writing process and developing their ability to write and express ideas in an organized, unified, and coherent manner. Students will produce college-level writing that reflects awareness of rhetorical strategies, writing purpose, student voice, and appropriate grammar, punctuation, and usage skills. Through reading, writing, discussion, research, and collaboration, students will practice effective writing and apply course concepts.

Prerequisite: Passing grade in Foundation coursework or placement determined by Rasmussen College entrance placement exam score

Course ID: G124
Credits: 4

Communication

Introduction to Communication

The course will introduce students to basic models and theories of the communication process. Students will learn about a variety of elements involved in communication. They will also explore how factors such as race, ethnicity, age, socioeconomic status, and gender influence communication. Students will focus on developing an awareness of the effects of various types of communication on themselves and others. They will also develop practical skills for improving their ability to communicate in personal, social and professional contexts. Specific topics will include perception, self-concept, verbal and nonverbal communication, effective listening and communicating in culturally diverse settings.

Prerequisite: Passing grade in Foundation coursework or placement determined by Rasmussen College entrance placement exam score

Course ID: G141
Credits: 4

English Composition 2

This course builds on students' understanding of the writing process through an exploration of various writing strategies and research. Students will analyze readings and apply critical reading and writing skills. This course will develop argumentative writing and application of research.

Prerequisite: English Composition

Course ID: G126A
Credits: 4

Oral Communication

This course will present students with a broad understanding of communication in a variety of contexts. Students will learn the processes and strategies of oral communication by exploring speech anxiety, audience analysis, and organizational speech patterns. Students will research, use supporting materials, and use effective language to develop and present a narrative, informative and persuasive speech.

Prerequisite: none

Course ID: G227
Credits: 4

Math/Natural Sciences

Structure and Function of the Human Body

This course provides a working knowledge of the structure and function of the human body. A general introduction to cells and tissues is followed by study of the anatomy and physiology of the skeletal and muscular systems. The student is introduced to the nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, reproductive, and endocrine systems.

Prerequisite: none

Course ID: G150
Credits: 4

Scientific Literacy

In this course students will explore the role that science plays in the world. Students will survey different natural sciences such as: biology, health sciences, chemistry, physics, astronomy, and geology; as well as analyze specific case studies from these fields. Throughout the course students will develop their scientific reasoning skills. They will learn about the scientific method as well as how to detect common fallacies and misuses of science.

Prerequisite: none

Course ID: G152
Credits: 4

General Education Mathematics

This course introduces students to topics from modern mathematics that are relevant to everyday life and not typically covered in the standard college math sequence. Students will be exposed to a variety of mathematical tools from diverse branches of mathematics. They will utilize these tools to solve interesting real-world problems. Topics may include, but are not limited to, game theory, graph theory, the mathematics of growth, applications of geometry, probability, and statistics.

Prerequisite: Passing grade in Foundation coursework or placement determined by Rasmussen College entrance placement exam score

Course ID: G180
Credits: 4

Introduction to Human Biology

Students will explore fundamental concepts of human biology. They will examine cell structure and function, body systems, and biochemistry. They will also learn basic concepts of genetics and evolution. Students will explore the relationship of human populations and the ecosystem. Students will complete laboratory exercise coordinated with course content.

Prerequisite: none

Course ID: G231
Credits: 4

College Algebra

This course provides students with the skills to achieve mastery of algebraic terminology and applications including, but not limited to, real number operations, variables, polynomials, integer exponents, graphs, factoring, quadratic equations, and word problems.

Prerequisite: Passing grade in Foundation coursework or placement determined by Rasmussen College entrance placement exam score

Course ID: G233
Credits: 4

Introduction to Astronomy

Examines astronomical phenomena and concepts, including the solar system, stars and galaxies, planetary motions, atoms and radiation, and the origin and evolution of the universe.

Prerequisite: none

Course ID: G239
Credits: 4

Introduction to Geology

Examines basic geologic principles from a physical or historical perspective. Includes such topics as the formation of rocks and minerals; internal and external processes modifying the earth's surface and phenomena; and the evolutionary history of the earth, including its life forms, oceans and atmosphere.

Prerequisite: none

Course ID: G245
Credits: 4

Humanities

Humanities

This course investigates human creative achievement. It is designed to increase the student's understanding and appreciation of cultural literacy and the pursuit of humanitarian goals. Representative disciplines may include art, music, literature, architecture, drama, and philosophy.

Prerequisite: none

Course ID: G125
Credits: 4

Film Appreciation

Students will study different elements, forms, techniques and styles of film and will learn a critical approach to film and the motion picture industry. Students will critique films and filmmakers through various approaches and assessments that demonstrate analysis, interpretation, and evaluation skills as well as fostering a deeper appreciation and understanding of film as an art form.

Prerequisite: none

Course ID: G145
Credits: 4

Art Appreciation

Students will examine the historical, social, and technological factors that contribute to understanding the function and meaning of art in this course. Using a global and thematic approach, students will be introduced to the basic elements of art, while learning about a full range of media used to make art, and the fundamental concepts of art criticism. Western and non-Western art is represented, with a strong emphasis on a global perspective in relation to culture, communication, politics, and economics.

Prerequisite: none

Course ID: G147
Credits: 4

Creative Writing

This course will develop the student's talents in creative writing. Various forms of writing will be studied, such as short stories, novels, poems, plays and non-fiction. Works by students and others will be critiqued. Students will also develop editorial skills so that each writer may revise and improve his/her work. Students will compose a minimum of 6000 words over the course of the program.

Prerequisite: Passing grade in Foundation coursework or placement determined by Rasmussen College entrance placement exam score

Course ID: G201
Credits: 4

Introduction to Critical Thinking

A study of the rules of valid judging and reasoning, both inductive and deductive, in a traditional, language-centered context rather than a symbolic context. Logical analysis of both formal and informal fallacies and of the consistency and logical consequences of a given set of statements. Logical analysis is applied to concrete problems dealing with our knowledge of reality.

Prerequisite: English Composition

Course ID: G224
Credits: 4

Introduction to Literature

This course offers an introduction to the most common literary genres: fiction, poetry, drama, and literary non-fiction. Students will study the basic elements of each genre, learn how to compare genres, become familiar with sample texts that illustrate the particularities of each genre, and practice the skills of analyzing and writing about literary texts. Reading and analysis of texts will include a variety of literary forms and periods. Students will engage in approaches to determine literary meaning, form, and value.

Prerequisite: none [English Composition recommended]

Course ID: G230
Credits: 4

Conversational Spanish

This course focuses on common words and phrases students need to develop a working vocabulary which will enable them to communicate with Spanish-speaking individuals in their personal and professional lives. Although oral communication is stressed, included is an overview of Spanish grammar, phonetic pronunciation and Hispanic culture.

Prerequisite: none

Course ID: G238
Credits: 4

Social Sciences

Introduction to Sociology

This course introduces students to basic sociology terms and concepts. Students will understand how to apply sociological concepts and theories and analyze the structure and relationships of social institutions and the process of social change. Students will explore a variety of topics of sociological interest, including socialization, social inequality, social movements, and the impact of technology and social change on society.

Prerequisite: none

Course ID: G142
Credits: 4

General Psychology

This course will provide students with a general understanding of basic methodologies, concepts, theories, and practices in contemporary psychology. Areas of investigation may include the goals and research methodologies of psychology, the science of the brain, theories of human development and intelligence, concepts of motivation and emotions, the science of sensation and perceptions, and the current practices pertaining to psychological disorders, therapies, and treatments.

Prerequisite: none

Course ID: G148
Credits: 4

Total Bachelor's Degree Credits

Lower Division General Education Credits: 32

Upper Division General Education Credits: 24

Lower Division Major and Core Credits: 59

Upper Division Major and Core Credits: 49

Upper Division Elective Credits: 16

Total BS Degree Credits: 180*

* Credit totals do not include Foundation Courses. Students must either demonstrate mastery of the subject matter in Foundation Courses through a Rasmussen College entrance placement exam or by successful completion of Foundation Courses.

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      Total cost of room & board is not applicable at Rasmussen College

      NA*
  • SOC Code

    Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) provides a representation of occupations for which graduates typically find employment

    Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) provides a representation of occupations for which graduates typically find employment