Human Services Bachelor's Degree

View courses for our Human Services Bachelor's degree. Download the course catalog for more information.

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Accelerated Human Services Bachelor's Degree Course List

Major and Core Courses

Upper Division

  • Ethics & Professionalism in Human Services
  • Interpersonal Relations for Helping Professions
  • Human Development Throughout the Lifespan
  • Human Sexuality
  • Theoretical Approaches to Service Delivery
  • Dynamics of Human Ecosystems
  • Working with Special Populations
  • Models and Techniques of Effective Helping
  • Applied Human Communication
  • Social Problems and Advocacy
  • Research Methodology in Human Services
  • Practical Application of Assessment and Evaluation
  • Intervention Strategies and Resources
  • Administration and Management in Human Services
  • Case Management in Practice
  • Pathways to Career Success

In this course, students will practice upholding ethical and professional standards within Human Services. This includes accurately and honestly documenting interactions with clients, adhering to rules of mandated reporting, and protecting clients’ confidentiality. Practice also includes creating and maintaining professional boundaries with clients and coworkers. This also includes contributing to a positive and professional working environment within the field.

Prerequisite:None

Course ID: HUS 3000
Credits: 4


In this course, students will develop a broader perspective on Human Services as a strategic, ethical leader. They will practice designing programs and implementation and evaluation plans to address a community need. They will also practice maintaining the responsibilities of a Human Services leader including managing individuals and supporting operational aspects of an agency. Finally, they will also work on addressing stakeholder needs and maintaining a solid reputation of an agency within their community.

Prerequisite:None

Course ID: HUS 3025
Credits: 4


In this course, students will use human development theories to explain how individuals develop and adapt theories to work with individuals one on one and in groups. Practice includes observing individuals and contextualizing their development histories using human development theory and identifying their development needs and gaps. Students will also identify how different variables such as the environment and culture impact a variety of types of development including physical, emotional, and psychosocial human development.

Prerequisite:None

Course ID: HUS 3110
Credits: 4


In this course, students will develop an awareness of historical, current, and cross-cultural perspectives on human sexuality. They will work through their initial reactions to individuals with different gender identities, sexual orientation, sexual behaviors, and experiences with sexual abuse. They will also acknowledge personal biases that may be barriers to working with others. Finally, they will also practice using effective techniques to address human sexuality related needs of clients.

Prerequisite:None

Course ID: HUS 3120
Credits: 4


In this course, students will explore a variety of theoretical approaches for treatment and intervention service delivery in the Human Services and use them to address individual client needs. They will practice using approaches for short term solutions, culturally diverse clients, and behavior change. Students will also practice assessing a Human Services agency’s theoretical approach and creating a plan to prepare themselves to successfully implement the approach in practice.

Prerequisite:None

Course ID: HUS 3130
Credits: 4


In this course, students will use an ecological systems perspective to view individuals within the broader context of the different systems they interact such as their family, work, school, community, and society. They will also explain how individuals’ historical context affects their current situation. Practice includes interacting with individuals to diagram the systems in which they interact and identifying strengths such as support systems to help enable them to make change in their lives.

Prerequisite:Theoretical Approaches to Service Delivery

Course ID: HUS 3260
Credits: 4


In this course, students will assess the attributes and needs of diverse populations served by Human Services such as elderly, children and family, GLBT, homeless, mentally and physically disabled, and ethnically diverse populations. They will also practice adapting strategies and locating resources to address the needs of those populations. They will also assess their own skills and potential challenges working with different populations to help shape their career path in the field.

Prerequisite:None

Course ID: HUS 3270
Credits: 4


In this course, students will develop the day to day skills necessary to work one on one with clients. Practice includes building rapport, guiding conversations, and establishing clear boundaries and expectations for relationships with clients. They will also practice self-care by setting goals, acknowledging personal limitations, organizing their time, and creating a support network. They will also practice managing stress using strategies that work best for them to help prevent burnout in the field.

Prerequisite:None

Course ID: HUS 3340
Credits: 4


In this course, students will practice using objective and professional verbal and non-verbal language when interacting with clients. This includes managing personal biases and controlling their emotions. Students will also practice creating informed opinions to become professional representatives in the field of Human Services. They will also practice using clear, concise, objective language to create goals, intervention plans, and document interactions with clients.

Prerequisite:None

Course ID: HUS 3350
Credits: 4


In this course, students will assess social problems from multiple perspectives and advocate for societal change to resolve social problems at a local, national, and global level. Perspectives include systems, historical, and sociological perspectives to analyze the root causes of the problem, the institutions and issues that compound the problem, and different ways of viewing and addressing the problem. Students will also practice selecting appropriate advocacy strategies and settings in which to effectively advocate for change.

Prerequisite:None

Course ID: HUS 4000
Credits: 4


In this course, students will evaluate research in the Human Services to determine its validity and applicability to addressing client needs. They will practice using basic research terms to accurately describe field research. They will also practice using basic research methods such as surveys and needs assessments to gather data to address client and community needs. They will also practice using available data to identify patterns and service gaps within a community.

Prerequisite:Theoretical Approaches to Service Delivery & Dynamics of Human Ecosystems

Course ID: HUS 4130
Credits: 4


In this course, students will practice completing intake interviews and observations to gather information to assess clients’ situation. They will also practice interpreting the information they gathered to identify client needs and document a social history. They will also practice using the Diagnostic Statistical Manual (DSM) to interpret clients’ diagnoses and identify needs related to mental health disorders. This course lays the groundwork for practicing developing and implementing intervention plans in the Intervention Plans and Resources course.

Prerequisite:None

Course ID: HUS 4140
Credits: 4


In this course, students will practice enabling clients to move through the stages of change and implement treatment plans to improve the quality of their lives. Practice includes using motivational interviewing strategies to help build self-efficacy and autonomy and to work through any conflicts between clients’ values, ideas, and behaviors. Students will also practice collaboratively creating treatment plans with clients. This includes defining goals and priorities, locating appropriate resources, and determining ways to measure progress.

Prerequisite:Practical Application of Assessment & Evaluation

Course ID: HUS 4220
Credits: 4


In this course, students will develop a broader perspective on Human Services as a strategic, ethical leader. They will practice designing programs and implementation and evaluation plans to address a community need. They will also practice maintaining the responsibilities of a Human Services leader including managing individuals and supporting operational aspects of an agency. Finally, they will also work on addressing stakeholder needs and maintaining a solid reputation of an agency within their community.

Prerequisite:None

Course ID: HUS 4230
Credits: 4


In this course, students will develop a broader perspective on Human Services as a strategic, ethical leader. They will practice designing programs and implementation and evaluation plans to address a community need. They will also practice maintaining the responsibilities of a Human Services leader including managing individuals and supporting operational aspects of an agency. Finally, they will also work on addressing stakeholder needs and maintaining a solid reputation of an agency within their community.

Prerequisite:None

Course ID: HUS 4300
Credits: 4


In this course, students will assess their personal values, beliefs, and interests in Human Services and create a relevant career path for their professional development. Practice includes exploring potential career opportunities and selecting specific populations to serve, needs to address, and settings to work in. They will also create career related goals, assess current strengths and growth opportunities, and identify strategies to address potential challenges they may encounter in the profession.

Prerequisite:None

Course ID: HUS 4440
Credits: 4

Choose a Track

Track I

  • Internship for Human Services II

The internship course represents the final milestone in the Human Services Bachelor’s program. Students will integrate the knowledge and skills gained to demonstrate achievement of the program outcomes through the completion of an internship in the field of Human Services. They will support their work by demonstrating their transferable skills including critical thinking, digital fluency, information literacy, ethics, communication, and diversity to support practice as a professional in the field of Human Services. Students will also participate in discussions and reflective exercises to support their work in the field and determine how to continue to develop as a professional in Human Services.

Prerequisite:Students must be in their last quarter before graduation.

Course ID: HUS 4460
Credits: 3

Track II

  • Human Services Capstone II

The capstone course represents the final milestone in the Human Services Bachelor’s program. Students will integrate the knowledge and skills gained to demonstrate achievement of the program outcomes. They will support their work by demonstrating their transferable skills including critical thinking, digital fluency, information literacy, ethics, communication, and diversity to support practice as a professional in the field of Human Services. Students will also participate in discussions and reflective exercises to determine how to continue to develop as a professional in the field.

Prerequisite:Students must be in their last quarter before graduation.

Course ID: HUS 4450
Credits: 3

General Education Courses

Upper Division

Communication (Required course)

  • Visual Communication in the Media

This course examines how people understand their world through visual images. Students will examine how people visually gather, process, and interpret information presented through media sources.

Prerequisite:None

Course ID: MMC 3407
Credits: 4

Humanities (Required courses)

  • Literature of American Minorities
  • Political Thought

This course introduces students to a variety of texts by American minority authors from the mid- 19th century to the present. The central focus of this course will be on literary responses to social marginalization based on race/ethnicity, gender, national origin, sexuality/sexual orientation, ability, and other factors. Students will study the effects of exclusionary and oppressive practices, both historical and present day, on writers' perceptions and literary representations of their times, contexts, and identity. Students will also be introduced to samples of the most common critical-theoretical approaches to the primary texts they will study in this class.

Prerequisite:English

Course ID: AML 4680
Credits: 4


The aim of this course is to understand and appreciate some important authors and traditions of political thought. The course will cover such topics as authority, consent, freedom and obligation.

Prerequisite:None

Course ID: POT 4001
Credits: 4

Math/Natural Sciences (Required course)

  • Human Uses of the Environment

This course provides an in-depth exploration of the integrated relationship between human life and the surrounding environment, beginning with a study of the fundamental concepts and principles of ecology. Topics that are interwoven throughout the course include principles of ecology as seen in the structure and function of the ecosystem; pollution of air, soil, and water resources; population explosion and the relationship of people, disease, and food production; and environmental controls necessary for survival.

Prerequisite:None

Course ID: EVR 3410
Credits: 4

Social Sciences (Required courses)

  • Visions of America Since 1945
  • Comparative Politics

Since the end of World War II, popular culture has become an especially significant aspect of American history and an important element in many of our lives. Consequently, this course will explore the ways in which popular culture has represented and mediated conflicts and tensions post-World War II. Through this lens, issues of gender and family relationships, as well as class and racial politics, will be discussed. The dual role of television as a reflective and manipulative force in the new suburban family and the role Hollywood films played in the popular culture will be examined.

Prerequisite:None

Course ID: AMH 3304
Credits: 4


This course will introduce students to the field of comparative politics by examining classification of political systems according to institutional and developmental characteristics. Causes and costs of political stability and instability will be explored. Comparison will be made between contemporary political institutions and processes in various countries.

Prerequisite:American/US National Government

Course ID: CPO 4003
Credits: 4

Total Bachelor's Degree Credits

Upper Level General Education Credits: 24

Upper Level Major and Core Credits: 67

Total Upper Division Credits: 91

Total Bachelor's Degree Credits: 181

* Total credits above assume students enter in with a conferred Associate's degree which grants them a transfer block inclusive of lower division general education and lower division major and core courses.

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